Eat. Play. Love.

All Posts for ‘cooking classes’ Category

 

Welcome to Cultivating Health! If you haven’t done so already, sign up for Juicy News, my monthly e-newsletter that gives you practical health and nutrition tips that will have a profound impact on your health and happiness if you’re ready for change. Juicy News topics include:

  • menu planningjuicy_icon
  • digestive issues
  • detoxification
  • hormonal imbalances
  • adrenal fatigue & stress
  • moods
  • cravings (especially sugar cravings)
  • play
  • playful eating
  • self-care
  • work-life balance

Of course, there is always a delicious, seasonal recipe in there, too!

In addition to juicy health tid bits, you will receive invitations to special events including nutrition playshops, cooking demos and classes and PLAY events.

As a token of my appreciation, you will receive a free 15 minute phone consult AND my Top Kitchen Tips & Tricks to save you time and aggravation and bring the fun back into meal prep.

Here’s to cultivating YOUR health!

 

gluten-free salads

We had a great time on Saturday at the “Gluten-Free Summer Salads Playshop.” The group whipped up five seasonal salads including a Buckwheat Garden Salad, Italian Aduki Bean Salad, Quinoa Salad with a Lemon Tahini Dressing, Raw Kale Salad and Blueberry Avocado Salad. All were quite beautiful and delicious. Well, almost all of them – the aduki bean salad looked just like that – dookie. Fortunately the taste made up for it and as one of my students said, “it reminds me of refried beans, only slightly prettier.” Although that’s not saying much, I guess the presentation of the dish was not a complete loss!

So I wanted to take the opportunity to share the recipe for the Blueberry Avocado Salad inspired by Kimberly Snyder. So yummy and I LOVE the contrast of the deep indigo blueberries with the bright green avocado. Add some red raspberries or strawberries to the salad to make it festive for the 4th of July! But before we get to the recipe, what are some benefits of blueberries?

Blueberries are a cooling food full of vitamin C, pro-vitamin A and manganese. Loaded with anthocyanins and other antioxidants, blueberries are anti-inflammatory, cancer-fighters! They help to keep your memory sharp, your blood sugar levels and cholesterol low and they are good for your eyes and contain bacterial fighting properties that help to keep your urinary system in good shape.

fresh berries

Here is a delicious, simple recipe that contains avocados which contain healthy fats to help you absorb the fat soluble pro-vitamin A in blueberries!

Blueberry & Avocado Salad

Source: inspired by The Beauty Detox Foods by Kimberly Snyder

Servings: 4

Ingredients:

  • 6 cups blueberries
  • 2 medium avocados, peeled and cut into 1-inch squares
  • 6 TBSP fresh lime juice
  • 2 – 4 tsp of raw honey, maple syrup or coconut nectar (or 10 drops stevia)
  • 3 – 4 TBSP of freshly chopped mint.

Directions:

1. Add the blueberries, avocado and mint to a mixing bowl.

2.  Whisk together the lime juice and sweetener and pour over the fruit. Gently toss together, being careful not to mash the avocado pieces.

3.  Enjoy!

 

What are some of your favorite ways to use blueberries? Please feel free to post them below!

 

Ditching Wheat Belly

  • June 18th, 2013

Let’s face it. Wheat isn’t what it used to be. It has been hybridized over the decades to contain more gluten, the sticky protein that gives bread it’s elasticity. Unfortunately, its “stickiness” has caused wheat to become increasingly more difficult for most of us to digest and creates inflammation in the body.  As a result, many people who are not celiac experience a variety of unpleasant symptoms and find that they feel better when they remove wheat from the diet.

In fact, it’s estimated that 99% of the people who have either a gluten intolerance or celiac disease are never diagnosed. Crazy, right?

So what are some of the common signs of a gluten intolerance?quinoa salad

  • bloating – wheat belly!
  • gas
  • digestive distress
  • fatigue
  • headaches and migraines
  • dizziness
  • auto-immune disease diagnosis
  • joint pain
  • hormone imbalances
  • mood swings

If you are experiencing any of these symptoms, consider eliminating wheat and other sources of gluten for 3 weeks and then re-introduce wheat and see what happens.

In the meantime, join me for “Gluten-Free Summer Salads” and learn how to use seasonal veggies, herbs and fruits to make an amazing dish for your next potluck or summer picnic. It IS possible to eat healthy and gluten-free at the neighborhood cookout without sacrificing taste. You’re dish will be a conversation piece, and folks will ask for the recipe after they have scarfed down every last morsel. We will also discuss proper bean and grain preparation techniques and how to store your fresh herbs. Includes materials, recipes, lunch and laughs.

 Feel free to post links to your favorite gluten-free recipes or resources here. One of my favorites is Elana’s Pantry.

 

Kids in the Kitchen

  • November 10th, 2011

 

Last month I had nine eager young chefs in my kitchen. We gathered to chat about how the health of the soils relates to the nutrient value in the plants that we eat. Bottom Line? Healthy soils = healthy people. After tracing ingredients in our favorite foods back to the soil and discussing the plant parts that we eat, the students headed to the food prep area to practice their knife skills. They learned proper techniques for chopping veggies such as carrots, cucumbers, peppers and onions. These ingredients were combined to create a tasty lentil salad that we shared together on the patio during a beautiful crisp autumn day.

 

Learning about the plant parts that we eat.

 

Parents often ask me how to get their kids to eat healthy and my response is to get them involved in a part of the process. For some, it’s growing fresh veggies and fruits. For others kids, its’s creating simple dishes using fun kitchen tools. In my experience working with youth, I have found that they are more likely to eat fresh fruits and veggies if they are involved in the entire process, from seed to plate. I wanted to share some of my tips for getting kids involved!

Give them a space in a kitchen cupboard to keep smaller, kid-friendly pots, pans, cutting board, a salad spinner and their other favorite kitchen utensils.

 

Give them a small shelf or drawer in the refrigerator with ingredients to make their own snacks. Some healthy snacks that your kids might store in the refrigerator include: cut veggies, grape tomatoes, fruit, nut butters, hummus, yoghurt dip, cottage cheese, black bean bean dip and hard-boiled eggs.

 

Purchase an inexpensive child’s apron or chef’s hat at your local craft store and let your child decorate it with fabric markers, appliques and puffy paint.

 

Provide a sturdy stool so that your child can reach the counter and sink. The object of the game is to make them as comfortable as possible. I find that these Kikkerland foldable stools from Bed, Bath and Beyond work very well and they come in fun colors!

 

If your child is old enough and mature enough to handle the responsibility of a knife, have them help cut fruits and veggies. If you never learned proper knife techniques and safety, consider taking a knife skills class and sharing that information with your child. Also, sign your child up for a cooking class that emphasizes knife skills and safety. This is the first think I teach in my cooking classes. Remember, a dull knife is a dangerous knife. I find it silly to give children tools (this goes for gardening tools, too) that aren’t sturdy or effective because they aren’t safe and it simply frustrates them and turns them off to cooking and gardening. With my kids cooking classes, I use Kuhn Rikon’s 3-inch Mini Prep Knife  and Cuisinart’s 5-inch Santoku Knife.

 

Giving a child a real knife and teaching them skills and safety is essential.

 

Have them help with the following tasks, especially if they are not old enough to use a knife:

  • Measure ingredients.
  • Set the table and light candles with assistance from an adult or older sibling.
  • Let them choose dinner music.
  • Have them make special place mats or place cards for family members and guests.
  • Encourage them to help with cleanup.
  • Break out the salad spinner and let them wash the lettuce. Kids also enjoy making salad dressing!

 

During the summer, give them a container in which to grow greens or a few easy herbs such as basil, chives, oregano or parsley (arugula is a great one that can be used as an herb or as a green for salad, sandwiches and pasta).

 

Get them started in composting indoors or outdoors as it encourages healthier snacks and foods without packaging! Indoor worm composting is a huge hit with kids.

 

If you have space, create a small veggie and herb garden with your child.

 

These are just a few ideas to get you started. I’ll be sharing more recipes and tips for cooking with kids in the coming months. In the meantime, enjoy making this lentil salad with your kids!

 

Lentil Salad

Source: adapted from The Daily Bean by Suzanne Caciola White

Serves: 8

Ingredients:

  • 4 cups of fresh watercress or spinach
  • 4 cups cooked lentils (pre-soak)
  • 1 cup chopped yellow pepper
  • 1 cup chopped green pepper
  • 1 cup chopped red pepper
  • 1 cup chopped orange pepper
  • 1 cup chopped red onion
  • 1 cup chopped celery
  • 2 cups cherry tomatoes (could use more)
  • sea salt and pepper to taste

Dressing:

  • 1 cup olive oil
  • 4 TBSP balsamic vinegar
  • 2 tsp Dijon mustard
  • 2 splashes of Worcestershire sauce
  • 1 TBSP honey

Directions:

Combine the beans, peppers, lentils, red onion, celery, cherry tomatoes and ¾ of the greens and toss lightly with the dressing.

To make the dressing, whisk together all ingredients and pour over the salad.

Serve on a bed of the leftover greens.

 

Kids enjoying their lentil salad on a crisp autumn day.

 
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